Skip to main content

News items related to Report

1–25 of 55 items | Next »

Education Under Arrest: The Case Against Police in Schools

The presence of school resource officers in schools, drives up arrests, causes lasting harm to youth, and disrupts the educational process.

When Treatment is Punishment: The Effects of Maryland's Incompetency to Stand Trial Policies and Practices

In FY2010, the Maryland Mental Hygiene Administration provided 789 pretrial screenings and evaluations for incompetency to stand trial, 77 percent of which were for the District Courts...

System Overload: The Costs of Under-Resourcing Public Defense

The overburdening of U.S. public defense systems that serve millions of people annually is jeopardizing the fairness of our justice system.

Gaming the System: How the Political Strategies of Private Prison Companies Promote Ineffective Incarceration Policies

Report examining how private prison companies wield influence over legislators and policy, ultimately resulting in harsher criminal justice policies and the incarceration of more people.

Due South: Looking to the South for Criminal Justice Innovations

Recognizing the significant costs associated with high incarceration rates, a number of Southern states have implemented innovative strategies for reducing  prison and jail populations.

Finding Direction: Expanding Criminal Justice Options by Considering Policies of Other Nations

Amidst a fiscal crisis and dropping crime rates, policymakers in the U.S. ought to consider looking outside its borders for examples of effective criminal justice policies.

Addicted to Courts: How a Growing Dependence on Drug Courts Impacts People and Communities

Report investigating the phenomenon of drug courts and providing alternatives to better address substance abuse issues.

When More is Less: How a Larger Women’s Jail in Baltimore will Reduce Public Safety and Diminish Resources for Positive Social Investments

Despite declines in the number of women held in the Baltimore City Detention Center, Maryland is planning to build a large, new women’s facility.

The Disparate Treatment of Native Hawaiians in the Criminal Justice System

The report examines the impact of the criminal justice system on Native Hawaiians. Detailing how Native Hawaiians are disproportionately impacted at various stages of Hawaii’s criminal justice system, the report also includes accounts of Native Hawaiian concerns with the criminal justice system. Findings from the report show that the criminal justice system incarcerates Native Hawaiians at a disproportionate rate.

The Costs of Confinement: Why Good Juvenile Justice Policies Make Good Fiscal Sense

Approximately 93,000 young people are held in juvenile justice facilities across the United States. Seventy percent of these youth are held in state-funded, postadjudication, residential facilities, at an average cost of $240.99 per day per youth.2 With states facing serious budgetary constraints, it is an opportune time for policymakers to consider ways to reduce juvenile justice spending that won’t compromise public safety.

Registering Harm: How Sex Offense Registries Fail Youth Communities

The Adam Walsh Act will not keep our children safe. Instead, this law will consume valuable law enforcement resources, needlessly target children and families, and undermine the very purpose of the juvenile justice system.

Gang Wars: The Failure of Enforcement Tactics and the Need for Effective Public Safety Strategies

Youth crime in the United States remains near the lowest levels seen in the past three decades, yet public concern and media coverage of gang activity has skyrocketed since 2000.

The Consequences Aren't Minor: The Impact of Trying Youth as Adults and Strategies for Reform

Despite a federal law that prohibits the incarceration of youth in adult correctional facilities, the number of young people held in jails across the country has exploded by 208 percent since the 1990s.

Maryland's Mandatory Minimum Drug Sentencing Laws: Their Impact on Incarceration, State Resources and Communities of Color

Mandatory minimum drug sentences fall hardest on communities of color, with nearly nine out of ten people sent to prison for a mandatory minimum drug sentence in Maryland being African American.

New York City's Alternative Incarceration Programs: Cut Crime, Cut Costs and Help People and Communities

Alternative to Incarceration Programs (ATIs) are an integral part of the strategy that has allowed the City to reduce crime, reduce jail and prison populations, and help individuals and neighborhoods across the City.

Treatment or Incarceration: National and State Findings on the Efficacy and Cost Savings of Drug Treatment Versus Imprisonment

This policy brief will survey research that shows that, on the whole, providing drug offenders with treatment is a more cost-effective way of dealing with substance addicted drug and nonviolent offenders than prison.

Treatment or Incarceration: National and State Findings on the Efficacy and Cost Savings of Drug Treatment Versus Imprisonment

This policy brief will survey research that shows that, on the whole, providing drug offenders with treatment is a more cost-effective way of dealing with substance addicted drug and nonviolent offenders than prison.

Race and Incarceration in Maryland

This policy brief will paint a general picture of the scale of overrepresentation of minorities in the state’s prison system, focusing particularly on the overrepresentation of African Americans among the state’s drug prisoner population.

Cost and Benefits? The Impact of Drug Imprisonment in New Jersey

Of the country’s 2 million prisoners,450,000 are incarcerated in prison or jail for drug offenses—more people than the European Union,  an entity with a 100 million more people, has in prison for all crimes combined.

Observations and Options for Relieving Overcrowding Among Alabama Female Prisoners

Even after paroling over 300 female prisoners this spring and sending 300 female prisoners to private prisons out of state, the prison facilities for female prisoners in Alabama are still operating at about 173% of their capacity.

Education and Incarceration

As of May, 2003, 21 states were considering proposals that would affect funding levels for K-12 education including across the board cuts, reducing transportation funds, slashing state aid for teachers’ salaries and lowering per pupil state aid.

Is Maryland's System of Higher Education Suffering Because of Prison Expenditures?

In a state which ranks fifth in the country in per capita wealth, Maryland's expenditures on higher education are not even in the top half of American states. In fact, in 1997, Maryland ranked 33rd in unversity funding, barely above the bottom third of all states.

Deep Impact: Quantifying the Effect of Prison Expansion in the South

From 1980 to 2002, the number of people incarcerated in the nation’s prisons, jails, juvenile facilities and detention centers quadrupled in size—from roughly 500,000 to 2.1 million people.

Drug Policies in the State of Michigan—Economic Effects

At a cost of approximately $28,000 per person, the State of Michigan currently spends in excess of $160 million dollars each year to incarcerate drug offenders.

Cutting Correctly in Maryland

State officials across the nation are struggling to come to terms with the largest state budget shortfall in 50 years.

1–25 of 55 items | Next »

JPI's work

Through a combination of groundbreaking research, communications strategies and technical assistance, we inform advocates, policymakers and the media about fair and effective approaches to justice and community well-being.

Learn more »

Contribute

We envision a society with safe, equitable and healthy communities; just and effective solutions to social problems; and the use of incarceration only as a last resort. Please help us end the #IncarcerationGeneration with a generous contribution.

Contribute »

Sign up for our newsletter