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News items related to Racial Disparities

Testimony of Justice Policy Institute Before the Maryland Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights

The Justice Policy Institute recently testified before the Maryland State Advisory Committee on civil right violations generated from racial disparities in the Maryland justice system.  As the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is considering civil right violations in the Maryland justice system, the State Advisory Committee invited JPI to testify before the committee.  The SAC will use the material in their report to the U.S. Commission on Civil Right.

JPI Daily News Digest 6/13/12

Criminal justice news of the day from June 13, 2012.

The Education of D.C.: How Washington D.C.’s investments in education can help increase public safety.

This brief examines the intersection of education and public safety in Washington, D.C.

Education Under Arrest: The Case Against Police in Schools

The presence of school resource officers in schools, drives up arrests, causes lasting harm to youth, and disrupts the educational process.

System Overload: The Costs of Under-Resourcing Public Defense

The overburdening of U.S. public defense systems that serve millions of people annually is jeopardizing the fairness of our justice system.

Finding Direction: Expanding Criminal Justice Options by Considering Policies of Other Nations

Amidst a fiscal crisis and dropping crime rates, policymakers in the U.S. ought to consider looking outside its borders for examples of effective criminal justice policies.

When More is Less: How a Larger Women’s Jail in Baltimore will Reduce Public Safety and Diminish Resources for Positive Social Investments

Despite declines in the number of women held in the Baltimore City Detention Center, Maryland is planning to build a large, new women’s facility.

The Disparate Treatment of Native Hawaiians in the Criminal Justice System

The report examines the impact of the criminal justice system on Native Hawaiians. Detailing how Native Hawaiians are disproportionately impacted at various stages of Hawaii’s criminal justice system, the report also includes accounts of Native Hawaiian concerns with the criminal justice system. Findings from the report show that the criminal justice system incarcerates Native Hawaiians at a disproportionate rate.

A Capitol Concern: The Disproportionate Impact of the Justice System on Low-Income Communities in D.C.
D.C. has the greatest income inequality of any major city in the country, suffering from major economic and racial disparities that contribute to high rates of justice-involvement.
The Release Valve: Parole in Maryland

In the current difficult economic situation, states are searching for ways to reduce spending while maintaining safe communities. With a $68 billion prison system holding over 2.3 million people in prisons and jails across the country—with no clear public safety gains—policymakers are looking to prison systems as a place to cut budgets.

The Vortex: The Concentrated Racial Impact of Drug Imprisonment and the Characteristics of Punitive Counties

Since 1970, the U.S. has experienced a large and rapid increase in the rate at which people are housed in federal and state correctional facilities. Currently, the U.S. incarceration rate is 491 per 100,000.

Maryland's Mandatory Minimum Drug Sentencing Laws: Their Impact on Incarceration, State Resources and Communities of Color

Mandatory minimum drug sentences fall hardest on communities of color, with nearly nine out of ten people sent to prison for a mandatory minimum drug sentence in Maryland being African American.

Disparity by Design: How Drug-Free Zone Laws impact Racial Disparity-and Fail to Protect Youth

Thanks to the work of concerned policymakers and reform advocates across the country, public discussions have been sparked in many states about the fairness and efficacy of drug-free zone laws.

Factsheet: Crime, Race and Juvenile Justice Policy in Perspective

African American youth arrest rates for drug violations, assaults and weapon offenses are higher than arrest rates for white youth—even though both report similar rates of delinquency.

Efficacy and Impact: The Criminal Justice Response to Marijuana Policy in the United States

There is no clear relationship between drug arrests and drug use, and the impact of increased arrests, convictions and incarcerations of people for marijuana offenses has significant and measurable “collateral consequences” on communities and individuals.

Race & Imprisonment in Texas: Policy Brief

America's criminal justice policies have had a disproportionate impact on African Americans, Latinos and other communities defined as non-White.

Racial Divide: California's 3 Strikes Law

California’s Three Strikes law has been plagued with questions about racial fairness since the beginning.

Race and Incarceration in Maryland

This policy brief will paint a general picture of the scale of overrepresentation of minorities in the state’s prison system, focusing particularly on the overrepresentation of African Americans among the state’s drug prisoner population.

Cellblocks or Classrooms?: The Funding of Higher Education and Corrections and its Impact on African American Men

The mild recession that began in 2001, aggravated by the events of September 11th, put state revenue into a tailspin in 2002, resulting in a $40 billion budget shortfall between what states planned to spend and the revenue they expected to raise.

Reducing Racial Disparities: Reducing Disproportionate Detention of Minority Youth - Pathways 8

Over the past two decades, the Annie E. Casey Foundation has organized and funded a series of projects aimed at safely minimizing populations in juvenile correctional facilities through fairer, better informed system policies and practices and the use of effective community-based alternatives.

Reducing Disproportionate Minority Confinement: The Multnomah County, Oregon Success Story and its Implications

The vast majority of youth in a detention center are awaiting trial for non-violent acts, and many should not be held in locked custody.

Drugs and Disparity: The Racial Impact of Illinois' Practice of Transferring Young Drug Offenders to Adult Court

As a result of laws passed in the mid-80s, 99% percent of the youth in Cook County, Illinois transferred to adult court for drug crimes are African-American or Latino.

Off Balance: Youth, Race & Crime in the News

In January 2000, the Building Blocks for Youth initiative issued its first report, The Color of Justice, which found that youth of color in California were more than eight times as likely to be incarcerated by adult courts as White youth for equally serious crimes.

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