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News items related to Positive Social Investments

Working for a Better Future: How expanding employment opportunities for D.C’s youth creates public safety benefits for all residents

This brief examines the intersection of youth employment and public safety in Washington, D.C.

Federal Folly: FY2012 U.S. Department of Justice Budget Gorges on Prisons, Gouges Juvenile Justice

The proposed 2012 budget for the U.S. Department of Justice puts locking people up ahead of reducing delinquency, protecting youth, and improving outcomes for the formerly incarcerated. 

Finding Direction: Expanding Criminal Justice Options by Considering Policies of Other Nations

Amidst a fiscal crisis and dropping crime rates, policymakers in the U.S. ought to consider looking outside its borders for examples of effective criminal justice policies.

When More is Less: How a Larger Women’s Jail in Baltimore will Reduce Public Safety and Diminish Resources for Positive Social Investments

Despite declines in the number of women held in the Baltimore City Detention Center, Maryland is planning to build a large, new women’s facility.

Money Well Spent: How Positive Social Investments Will Reduce Incarceration Rates, Improve Public Safety, and Promote the Well-Being of Communities.

More people in the United States are being arrested and incarcerated even though crime has dropped, with the consequences of these policies being felt most by low-income communities.

A Capitol Concern: The Disproportionate Impact of the Justice System on Low-Income Communities in D.C.
D.C. has the greatest income inequality of any major city in the country, suffering from major economic and racial disparities that contribute to high rates of justice-involvement.
For Immediate Release: How to Safely Reduce Prison Populations and Support People Returning to Their Communities

Reducing prison populations and maintaining public safety can both be accomplished while allowing state taxpayers to save money with more effective programs, group says.

Effective Investments in Public Safety: Drug Treatment

Whereas in 1980 only about 8% of federal and state prisoners were incarcerated for a drug offense, in 2003, 55 percent of the federal prison population and 20 percent of prisoners in state facilities were incarcerated for drug offenses.

Effective Investments in Public Safety: Education

There is evidence that suggests that education and graduation rates may relate to crime rates, and this new research comes at a time when education programs are receiving less and less funding, and more money is being spent to incarceration—a public safety policy that has not been proven to lower crime rates.

Effective Investments in Public Safety: Mass Incarceration and Longer Sentences Fail to Make Us Safer

Places that did not increase their use of incarceration as much as others experienced bigger drops in crime.

Effective Investments in Public Safety: Unemployment, Wages, and the Crime Rate

Research studies focusing on unemployment rates and market wages have found relationships with the crime rate in the United States.

Education and Incarceration

As of May, 2003, 21 states were considering proposals that would affect funding levels for K-12 education including across the board cuts, reducing transportation funds, slashing state aid for teachers’ salaries and lowering per pupil state aid.

Is Maryland's System of Higher Education Suffering Because of Prison Expenditures?

In a state which ranks fifth in the country in per capita wealth, Maryland's expenditures on higher education are not even in the top half of American states. In fact, in 1997, Maryland ranked 33rd in unversity funding, barely above the bottom third of all states.

Cellblocks or Classrooms?: The Funding of Higher Education and Corrections and its Impact on African American Men

The mild recession that began in 2001, aggravated by the events of September 11th, put state revenue into a tailspin in 2002, resulting in a $40 billion budget shortfall between what states planned to spend and the revenue they expected to raise.

Workforce and Youth Development: Barriers and Promising Approaches to Workforce and Youth Development for Young Offenders

With juvenile crime and justice receiving sustained attention and study, employment and training programs for court-involved young people have been examined as providing solutions to some of the challenges facing the nation’s juvenile justice system.

Class Dismissed: Higher Education vs. Corrections During the Wilson Years

An increase in funding for Higher Education represents a step in the right direction, but this is an unusual year in that California had a 4 billion-dollar surplus at the end of the 1997-1998 budget.

New York State of Mind: Higher Education vs. Prison Funding in the Empire State, 1988-1998

Last spring, just days before New Yorkers were to mark the 25th anniversary of the state’s Rockefeller Drug Laws - a mandatory sentencing scheme that requires long prison terms for the possession or sale of a relatively small amount of drugs - Gov. George Pataki announced a series of vetoes to the state budget.

Trading Classrooms for Cell Blocks: Destructive Policies Eroding D.C. Communities

While public higher education funding plummets to record lows, spending for corrections is at an all-time high. The nation's capital is funding prisons at the expense of higher education and the consequences are devastating for District communities.

From Classrooms to Cell Blocks: A National Perspective

Americans will soon be forced to spend their tax-free education funds on an ineffective, costly criminal justice system.

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