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JPI Daily News Digest 6/29/12

Criminal Justice News of the Day for June 29, 2012

Working for a Better Future: How expanding employment opportunities for D.C’s youth creates public safety benefits for all residents

This brief examines the intersection of youth employment and public safety in Washington, D.C.

Behind the Times: President Obama's FY2013 Budget

Despite the fact that prison populations have fallen for the first time in 40 years, President Obama’s FY2013 budget released this week devotes more than $27 billion to prison and policing.

The Education of D.C.: How Washington D.C.’s investments in education can help increase public safety.

This brief examines the intersection of education and public safety in Washington, D.C.

Federal Folly: FY2012 U.S. Department of Justice Budget Gorges on Prisons, Gouges Juvenile Justice

The proposed 2012 budget for the U.S. Department of Justice puts locking people up ahead of reducing delinquency, protecting youth, and improving outcomes for the formerly incarcerated. 

Education Under Arrest: The Case Against Police in Schools

The presence of school resource officers in schools, drives up arrests, causes lasting harm to youth, and disrupts the educational process.

DC Council Testimony on Bill 19-255, Sex Offender Registration Amendment Act

This testimony was presented to the DC City Council Committee on the Judiciary in regards to Bill 19-255, The Sex Offender Registration Amendment Act. 

Finding Direction: Expanding Criminal Justice Options by Considering Policies of Other Nations

Amidst a fiscal crisis and dropping crime rates, policymakers in the U.S. ought to consider looking outside its borders for examples of effective criminal justice policies.

Doing the Same Thing and Expecting Different Results

The President’s proposed FY2012 budget will do little to reduce the burden of incarceration on our country or improve community safety in a lasting and meaningful way.

Testimony of JPI Executive Director to D.C. Council on Improving Juvenile Justice Outcomes

Many cities, D.C. have a high rate of poverty – about 1 in 5 residents and 30 percent of children live in poverty, and one resident in ten lives in extreme poverty – that is, 50 percent or less of the federal poverty level.  Race and poverty cannot be disentangled here in D.C.:  Black residents here are three times more likely than white residents to live in poverty.

Money Well Spent: How Positive Social Investments Will Reduce Incarceration Rates, Improve Public Safety, and Promote the Well-Being of Communities.

More people in the United States are being arrested and incarcerated even though crime has dropped, with the consequences of these policies being felt most by low-income communities.

Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense

As many as 9 in 10 youth in justice system have experienced a traumatic event, yet few such youth are identified as traumatized, and fewer receive appropriate treatment or placement

The Costs of Confinement: Why Good Juvenile Justice Policies Make Good Fiscal Sense

Approximately 93,000 young people are held in juvenile justice facilities across the United States. Seventy percent of these youth are held in state-funded, postadjudication, residential facilities, at an average cost of $240.99 per day per youth.2 With states facing serious budgetary constraints, it is an opportune time for policymakers to consider ways to reduce juvenile justice spending that won’t compromise public safety.

Registering Harm: How Sex Offense Registries Fail Youth Communities

The Adam Walsh Act will not keep our children safe. Instead, this law will consume valuable law enforcement resources, needlessly target children and families, and undermine the very purpose of the juvenile justice system.

Factsheet Series on SORNA Registries and Youth

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA)1, which mandates a national registry of people convicted of sex offenses and expands the type of offenses for which a person must register, applies to both adults and children.

Factsheet: DC Crime and Arrest Statistics

Locking up youth in adult jails is not an effective method for increasing public safety in District neighborhoods, as youth are responsible for only a small percentage of the crimes committed in D.C.

Gang Wars: The Failure of Enforcement Tactics and the Need for Effective Public Safety Strategies

Youth crime in the United States remains near the lowest levels seen in the past three decades, yet public concern and media coverage of gang activity has skyrocketed since 2000.

Coalition Letter against Feinstein Gang Bill

The National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition comments on the new version of S. 456, the Gang Abatement and Prevention Act of 2007.

The Consequences Aren't Minor: The Impact of Trying Youth as Adults and Strategies for Reform

Despite a federal law that prohibits the incarceration of youth in adult correctional facilities, the number of young people held in jails across the country has exploded by 208 percent since the 1990s.

Models for Change: Building Momentum for Juvenile Justice Reform

Juvenile justice policy in the United States has quietly passed a milestone. After a decade shaped by myths of juvenile “superpredators” and the ascendancy of punitive reforms, momentum for systemic reforms is growing. Significant new research on adolescent development and the demonstrated success of evidence-based practices have buoyed efforts to reestablish more rational and effective policies.

The Dangers of Detention: The Impact of Incarcerating Youth in Detention and Other Secure Facilities

Despite the lowest youth crime rates in 20 years, hundreds of thousands of young people are locked away every year in the nation’s 591 secure detention centers. Detention centers are intended to temporarily house youth who pose a high risk of re-offending before their trial, or who are deemed likely to not appear for their trial.

Fact Sheet: Rising Juvenile Crime in Perspective

The 2005 FBI Uniform Crime Reports were released and some media noted concerns of a 19 percent increase in juvenile murder arrests.

Crime Statistics and the Washington, D.C. "Crime Emergency:" What is the Real Crisis and How Should We Respond

Crime, the causes of crime, and potential solutions to the Districts’ crime problems are more complicated and nuanced than they have been portrayed by law enforcement and politicians during the “crime emergency” debate.

You are Safer than You Think: Crime and Public Opinion on Fear of Crime

While the overall crime picture in Washington D.C. has not changed dramatically, the proportion of registered voters concerned about crime has surged, according to polling conducted by The Washington Post.

DC Crime Emergency In Context

The Mayor’s emergency proposal to crackdown on D.C. youth through an historic erosion of youth protections, and increased surveillance and policing is not justified by crime data or best practices for enhancing public safety.

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