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News items related to Incarceration

Bail Fail: Why the U.S. Should End the Practice of Using Money for Bail

JPI's newest analysis shows that the practice of using money to decide release while awaiting trial unfairly impacts low-income communities.

Behind the Times: President Obama's FY2013 Budget

Despite the fact that prison populations have fallen for the first time in 40 years, President Obama’s FY2013 budget released this week devotes more than $27 billion to prison and policing.

Gaming the System: How the Political Strategies of Private Prison Companies Promote Ineffective Incarceration Policies

Report examining how private prison companies wield influence over legislators and policy, ultimately resulting in harsher criminal justice policies and the incarceration of more people.

Finding Direction: Expanding Criminal Justice Options by Considering Policies of Other Nations

Amidst a fiscal crisis and dropping crime rates, policymakers in the U.S. ought to consider looking outside its borders for examples of effective criminal justice policies.

When More is Less: How a Larger Women’s Jail in Baltimore will Reduce Public Safety and Diminish Resources for Positive Social Investments

Despite declines in the number of women held in the Baltimore City Detention Center, Maryland is planning to build a large, new women’s facility.

Fact Sheet: DOJ Report on Prisoners in 2008

The Department of Justice released its annual survey of prisons this week, reporting that more than 1.6 million people are currently incarcerated in a federal or state prison. The report shows that although the growth in imprisonment is down, the number of people in prison is still increasing, up more than 12,000 people from last year.

Fact Sheet: Response to 2008 FBI Uniform Crime Report (Full)

The full 2008 FBI Uniform Crime Report was released Monday, September 14, 2009 with the positive news that the United States experienced a 1.9 percent decline in violent crimes and a 0.8 percent decline in property crimes reported in 2008. This drop in crime came at a time when the prison and jail growth rates fell from previous years.

Jailing Communities: The Impact of Jail Expansion and Effective Jail Expansion and Public Safety Strategies

Communities are bearing the cost of a massive explosion in the jail population which has nearly doubled in less than two decades. The research found that jails are now warehousing more people--who have not been found guilty of any crime--for longer periods of time than ever before.

The Vortex: The Concentrated Racial Impact of Drug Imprisonment and the Characteristics of Punitive Counties

Since 1970, the U.S. has experienced a large and rapid increase in the rate at which people are housed in federal and state correctional facilities. Currently, the U.S. incarceration rate is 491 per 100,000.

The Consequences Aren't Minor: The Impact of Trying Youth as Adults and Strategies for Reform

Despite a federal law that prohibits the incarceration of youth in adult correctional facilities, the number of young people held in jails across the country has exploded by 208 percent since the 1990s.

Tipping Point: Maryland's Overuse of Incarceration and the Impact on Public Safety

This policy brief highlights the large number of people being removed from Maryland communities and its impact on public safety.

Race and Incarceration in Maryland

This policy brief will paint a general picture of the scale of overrepresentation of minorities in the state’s prison system, focusing particularly on the overrepresentation of African Americans among the state’s drug prisoner population.

Cost and Benefits? The Impact of Drug Imprisonment in New Jersey

Of the country’s 2 million prisoners,450,000 are incarcerated in prison or jail for drug offenses—more people than the European Union,  an entity with a 100 million more people, has in prison for all crimes combined.

Observations and Options for Relieving Overcrowding Among Alabama Female Prisoners

Even after paroling over 300 female prisoners this spring and sending 300 female prisoners to private prisons out of state, the prison facilities for female prisoners in Alabama are still operating at about 173% of their capacity.

Education and Incarceration

As of May, 2003, 21 states were considering proposals that would affect funding levels for K-12 education including across the board cuts, reducing transportation funds, slashing state aid for teachers’ salaries and lowering per pupil state aid.

Deep Impact: Quantifying the Effect of Prison Expansion in the South

From 1980 to 2002, the number of people incarcerated in the nation’s prisons, jails, juvenile facilities and detention centers quadrupled in size—from roughly 500,000 to 2.1 million people.

Too Little Too Late: President Clinton's Prison Legacy

The latest criminal justice statistics show that it was actually Democratic President Bill Clinton who implemented arguably the most punitive platform on crime in the last two decades.

Texas Tough: An Analysis of Incarceration and Crime Trends in The Lone Star State

Since 1990, nearly one in five new prisoners added to the nation’s prisons (18%) was in Texas.

The Punishing Decade: Prison and Jail Estimates at the Millennium

As the century draws to a close, we can safely predict that America will end the 1990s by having put more people behind bars than in any other decade in our history.

America's One Million Nonviolent Prisoners

Most of the growth in America’s prisons since 1978 is accounted for by nonviolent offenders and 1998 is the first year in which America’s prisons and jails incarcerated more than 1 million nonviolent offenders.

Striking Out: The Failure of California’s “Three Strikes and You’re Out” Law

The law was dubbed “three-strikes and you’re out” because of its provision requiring 25 to life prison terms for defendants convicted of any felony who were already convicted of two “serious” or “violent” felonies.

Class Dismissed: Higher Education vs. Corrections During the Wilson Years

An increase in funding for Higher Education represents a step in the right direction, but this is an unusual year in that California had a 4 billion-dollar surplus at the end of the 1997-1998 budget.

New York State of Mind: Higher Education vs. Prison Funding in the Empire State, 1988-1998

Last spring, just days before New Yorkers were to mark the 25th anniversary of the state’s Rockefeller Drug Laws - a mandatory sentencing scheme that requires long prison terms for the possession or sale of a relatively small amount of drugs - Gov. George Pataki announced a series of vetoes to the state budget.

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