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News items related to Cost Savings

Bail Fail: Why the U.S. Should End the Practice of Using Money for Bail

JPI's newest analysis shows that the practice of using money to decide release while awaiting trial unfairly impacts low-income communities.

September is JPI Bail Month: Attend one of our Events, Read our Reports, Spread the Word

This month, JPI is dedicating all of its resources to educating the public on bail. Learn more during one of our three events and read our three reports.

System Overload: The Costs of Under-Resourcing Public Defense

The overburdening of U.S. public defense systems that serve millions of people annually is jeopardizing the fairness of our justice system.

When More is Less: How a Larger Women’s Jail in Baltimore will Reduce Public Safety and Diminish Resources for Positive Social Investments

Despite declines in the number of women held in the Baltimore City Detention Center, Maryland is planning to build a large, new women’s facility.

Shifting the Problem: Fact Sheet on Proposed California Community Corrections Enhancement Act
California’s Prison Reduction Plan Will Overburden Counties; Misses the Mark.
Shifting prison population to jails will increase costs and incarceration rates.
For Immediate Release: How to Safely Reduce Prison Populations and Support People Returning to Their Communities

Reducing prison populations and maintaining public safety can both be accomplished while allowing state taxpayers to save money with more effective programs, group says.

Pruning Prisons: How Cutting Corrections Can Save Money and Protect Public Safety

Federal, state and local governments are spending a combined $68 billion dollars a year on a system that does not definitively improve public safety, but, instead, destabilizes communities, harms families, and derails the lives of individuals.

The Costs of Confinement: Why Good Juvenile Justice Policies Make Good Fiscal Sense

Approximately 93,000 young people are held in juvenile justice facilities across the United States. Seventy percent of these youth are held in state-funded, postadjudication, residential facilities, at an average cost of $240.99 per day per youth.2 With states facing serious budgetary constraints, it is an opportune time for policymakers to consider ways to reduce juvenile justice spending that won’t compromise public safety.

The Release Valve: Parole in Maryland

In the current difficult economic situation, states are searching for ways to reduce spending while maintaining safe communities. With a $68 billion prison system holding over 2.3 million people in prisons and jails across the country—with no clear public safety gains—policymakers are looking to prison systems as a place to cut budgets.

Cost and Benefits? The Impact of Drug Imprisonment in New Jersey

Of the country’s 2 million prisoners,450,000 are incarcerated in prison or jail for drug offenses—more people than the European Union,  an entity with a 100 million more people, has in prison for all crimes combined.

Drug Policies in the State of Michigan—Economic Effects

At a cost of approximately $28,000 per person, the State of Michigan currently spends in excess of $160 million dollars each year to incarcerate drug offenders.

Cutting Correctly in Maryland

State officials across the nation are struggling to come to terms with the largest state budget shortfall in 50 years.

Community Corrections in Ohio-Cost Savings and Program Effectiveness

Commuity corrections programs are generally cheaper, because they entail shorter periods of control, but are also thought to be more effective than residential prisons and jails in reducing future criminal behavior.

Cutting Correctly: New Prison Policies for Times of Fiscal Crisis

It cost nearly $40 billion to imprison approximately two million state and local inmates in 2000, up from $5billion in 1978. Twenty-four billion of that was spent on incarceration for non-violent offenders.  

Poor Prescription: The Cost of Imprisoning Drug Offenders in the United States

Americans will spend nearly $40 billion on prisons and jails in the year 2000. Almost $24 billion of that will go to incarcerate 1.2 million nonviolent offenders.

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