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Research tagged with Public Safety

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Bail Fail: Why the U.S. Should End the Practice of Using Money for Bail

JPI's newest analysis shows that the practice of using money to decide release while awaiting trial unfairly impacts low-income communities.

The Education of D.C.: How Washington D.C.’s investments in education can help increase public safety.

This brief examines the intersection of education and public safety in Washington, D.C.

DC Council Testimony on Bill 19-255, Sex Offender Registration Amendment Act

This testimony was presented to the DC City Council Committee on the Judiciary in regards to Bill 19-255, The Sex Offender Registration Amendment Act. 

Finding Direction: Expanding Criminal Justice Options by Considering Policies of Other Nations

Amidst a fiscal crisis and dropping crime rates, policymakers in the U.S. ought to consider looking outside its borders for examples of effective criminal justice policies.

Doing the Same Thing and Expecting Different Results

The President’s proposed FY2012 budget will do little to reduce the burden of incarceration on our country or improve community safety in a lasting and meaningful way.

Moving Toward a Public Safety Paradigm: A Roundtable Discussion on Victims and Criminal Justice Reform

This brief details a roundtable convened by JPI examining the role of victims in justice reform.

When More is Less: How a Larger Women’s Jail in Baltimore will Reduce Public Safety and Diminish Resources for Positive Social Investments

Despite declines in the number of women held in the Baltimore City Detention Center, Maryland is planning to build a large, new women’s facility.

Byrne Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Spending

A review of the $2 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds spent on the Byrne Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program.

Money Well Spent: How Positive Social Investments Will Reduce Incarceration Rates, Improve Public Safety, and Promote the Well-Being of Communities.

More people in the United States are being arrested and incarcerated even though crime has dropped, with the consequences of these policies being felt most by low-income communities.

A Capitol Concern: The Disproportionate Impact of the Justice System on Low-Income Communities in D.C.
D.C. has the greatest income inequality of any major city in the country, suffering from major economic and racial disparities that contribute to high rates of justice-involvement.
Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense

As many as 9 in 10 youth in justice system have experienced a traumatic event, yet few such youth are identified as traumatized, and fewer receive appropriate treatment or placement

Fact Sheet on The Obama Administration’s 2011 Budget: More Policing, Prisons, and Punitive Policies

Justice advocates disturbed by proposed $29 billion for ineffective and unfair policies.

Fact Sheet: DOJ Report on Prisoners in 2008

The Department of Justice released its annual survey of prisons this week, reporting that more than 1.6 million people are currently incarcerated in a federal or state prison. The report shows that although the growth in imprisonment is down, the number of people in prison is still increasing, up more than 12,000 people from last year.

Fact Sheet: Response to 2008 FBI Uniform Crime Report (Full)

The full 2008 FBI Uniform Crime Report was released Monday, September 14, 2009 with the positive news that the United States experienced a 1.9 percent decline in violent crimes and a 0.8 percent decline in property crimes reported in 2008. This drop in crime came at a time when the prison and jail growth rates fell from previous years.

Pruning Prisons: How Cutting Corrections Can Save Money and Protect Public Safety

Federal, state and local governments are spending a combined $68 billion dollars a year on a system that does not definitively improve public safety, but, instead, destabilizes communities, harms families, and derails the lives of individuals.

The Release Valve: Parole in Maryland

In the current difficult economic situation, states are searching for ways to reduce spending while maintaining safe communities. With a $68 billion prison system holding over 2.3 million people in prisons and jails across the country—with no clear public safety gains—policymakers are looking to prison systems as a place to cut budgets.

Fact Sheet: Response to 2008 FBI Uniform Crime Report

The FBI Preliminary Semiannual Uniform Crime Report was released Monday, January 12th with the news that the United States experienced a 3.5 percent decline in the number of reported violent offenses and a 2.5 percent decline in the number of reported property offenses in the first half of 2008.

Registering Harm: How Sex Offense Registries Fail Youth Communities

The Adam Walsh Act will not keep our children safe. Instead, this law will consume valuable law enforcement resources, needlessly target children and families, and undermine the very purpose of the juvenile justice system.

Moving Target: A Decade of Resistance to the Prison Industrial Complex

For the past 10 years, Critical Resistance has helped advocates imagine the possibility of a world without bars. If our country is to truly reclaim its communities, the criminal justice system must be dismantled.

Factsheet: Response to 2007 FBI Uniform Crime Report

The FBI Uniform Crime Report was released Monday, September 15th with the news that the United States experienced a 1.4 percent decline in the violent crime rate and a 2.1 percent decline in the property crime rate in 2007. This drop in crime came at a time when the prison and jail growth rates fell from previous years.

Factsheet: DC Crime and Arrest Statistics

Locking up youth in adult jails is not an effective method for increasing public safety in District neighborhoods, as youth are responsible for only a small percentage of the crimes committed in D.C.

Substance Abuse Treatment and Public Safety

Community-based substance abuse treatment reduces crime rates and helps states reduce corrections costs. The sooner substance abuse is treated, the bigger the cost savings and increases in public safety.

Public Safety Brief: Housing and Public Safety

Studies found that substandard housing—particularly where exposure to lead hazards is more likely to occur—is associated with higher violent crime rates.

Employment, Wages and Public Safety

Increased employment is associated with positive public safety outcomes. Researchers have found that from 1992 to 1997, a time when the unemployment rate dropped 33 percent, "slightly more than 40 percent of the decline [in overall property crime rate] can be attributed to the decline in unemployment."

Education and Public Safety Policy Brief

Graduation rates were associated with positive public safety outcomes. Researchers have found that a 5 percent increase in male high school graduation rates would produce an annual savings of almost $5 billion in crime-related expenses.

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