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JPI Daily News Digest 12/11/2012

MD: Maryland won't face up to discrimination in criminal justice (Baltimore Sun)
In June, the Maryland State Advisory Committee (SAC) to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held a daylong briefing in Annapolis to gather information about racial disparities in Maryland's criminal justice system. As advocates for reform, we were initially pleased that this important issue would be addressed by the SAC and hoped this would be a major step forward in terms of creating a fairer justice system in Maryland.

PA: State high court adopts new juvenile offender appeal rules (Citizens Voice)
The state Supreme Court, reacting to the kids-for-cash scandal, adopted new rules that will speed appeals by juvenile offenders who challenge their placement in a treatment or detention center.

NJ: Exploring the Use of Pell Grants To Go From Prison to College (JJIE)
Recidivism could be cut and public dollars could be saved if lawmakers lifted a longstanding federal ban on Pell grants to prisoners.Those were some of the key arguments made at Rutgers University last week by a group of academics, criminal justice reformers and formerly incarcerated individuals in a fledgling program meant to serve as a bridge from a youth correctional facility to college.

KS: Brownback Proposes Move For Juvenile Justice Authority (WIBW)
The state's juvenile and adult offenders could soon once again be managed under the same agency.Gov. Sam Brownback announced Monday that he's proposing an executive reorganization order putting the Juvenile Justice Authority under the Kansas Department of Corrections.

International News
Australia: Judge Michael Shanahan says locking up juvenile criminals in detention doesn't work (The Australian)
In a rare interview, Judge Michael Shanahan raised concerns about State Government budget cuts to programs helping troubled youths and said sending young offenders to detention only set them on a path towards adult jail. "Detention doesn't turn them around. They start moving into the adult system and in due course they'll be in jail," he said.


Posted in JPI Daily News Digest